Neurohormone Research

Helo

New member
I was wondering if anyone had spent much time researching or had any working knowledge of neurohypophysial hormones, specifically oxytocin.

For various reasons, I've spent the last several months researching it, how the body produces it, and the mechanics of its actions in the body and the brain. I've gone through almost everything available online and been hacking through some textbooks that I've...come across and frankly run into a bit of a wall.

Some literal ones in the form of paywalls to the really good research and some figurative ones in that I'm just way in over my head with a lot of this. A lot of it seems to be academic-speak for "fuck if we know."

A little knowledge sharing would be a great help right about now.
 

AphroditeGoneAwry

New member
I was wondering if anyone had spent much time researching or had any working knowledge of neurohypophysial hormones, specifically oxytocin.

For various reasons, I've spent the last several months researching it, how the body produces it, and the mechanics of its actions in the body and the brain. I've gone through almost everything available online and been hacking through some textbooks that I've...come across and frankly run into a bit of a wall.

Some literal ones in the form of paywalls to the really good research and some figurative ones in that I'm just way in over my head with a lot of this. A lot of it seems to be academic-speak for "fuck if we know."

A little knowledge sharing would be a great help right about now.


Why oxytocin specifically?
 

Helo

New member
Why oxytocin specifically?
Oxytocin does a number of things in the brain and among those is a somewhat nebulous (as far as I have been able to piece together) relationship with physical contact in humans. The levels of oxytocin in the blood flux when someone is touched and leads to feelings of comfort and attachment to another person.

I've noted a somewhat abnormal reaction in my own self with regards to physical contact and after several months of backtracking, oxytocin is the most likely candidate for the X factor.
 

AphroditeGoneAwry

New member
Oxytocin does a number of things in the brain and among those is a somewhat nebulous (as far as I have been able to piece together) relationship with physical contact in humans. The levels of oxytocin in the blood flux when someone is touched and leads to feelings of comfort and attachment to another person.

I've noted a somewhat abnormal reaction in my own self with regards to physical contact and after several months of backtracking, oxytocin is the most likely candidate for the X factor.


How did you track it to oxytocin? Do you mean in yourself, or the other?
 
I suspect that like most things, oxytocin interacts in a complex way with other chemicals in the body and that it is affected also by what we do with our bodies and how we interpret the world around us.

Rises in oxytocin are also associated with stroking pets. Dogs also experience rises in oxytocin when interacting with humans (and probably other dogs too).

Probably the scientific speak for "fuck if we know" is right about it.

Candace Pert writes some good stuff about neurotransmitters - particularly about the influence of the mind and the body on each other. Her books are written for lay people so quite easy to follow.

Here's a youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJBUmdXxsSg

I also rather like Bruce Lipton's book Biology of Belief which covers some epigenetics - so more about how the environment around us can influence the way our bodies work.

Fascinating stuff. :)
 

Helo

New member
How did you track it to oxytocin? Do you mean in yourself, or the other?
In myself.

Being of limited resources (and apparently limited capacity to influence healthcare professionals) a lot of it has had to come from awareness of my own body.

I noted that the changes in mood and the physical reactions happened after periods of intimate (though not necessarily sexual) contact. There is only a limited number of reactions the body has as a reaction to touch, oxytocin being one of them. With oxytocin's role in increasing pair bonding and engendering feelings of trust with someone else, you can draw the conclusion that oxytocin is the most likely actor.

I suspect that like most things, oxytocin interacts in a complex way with other chemicals in the body and that it is affected also by what we do with our bodies and how we interpret the world around us.

Rises in oxytocin are also associated with stroking pets. Dogs also experience rises in oxytocin when interacting with humans (and probably other dogs too).

Probably the scientific speak for "fuck if we know" is right about it.

Candace Pert writes some good stuff about neurotransmitters - particularly about the influence of the mind and the body on each other. Her books are written for lay people so quite easy to follow.

Here's a youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJBUmdXxsSg

I also rather like Bruce Lipton's book Biology of Belief which covers some epigenetics - so more about how the environment around us can influence the way our bodies work.

Fascinating stuff. :)
Indeed, I'd not seen that video, thank you.

I actually brought it up here because I think the poly community has a little more insight and experience with the effects of oxytocin than others might. We recognize its influence and we even have a term for it; "new relationship energy."
 

LovingRadiance

Active member
You might dig around in research regarding premature babies. It is a highly desired topic of study-so tends to get decent funding-thus resulting in more studies and more data.
One of the key details that has been studied is the need of babies for physical touch and what it does in terms of benefits and how-which-very well could lead to finding more info on oxytocin in that circumstance-which doesn't cross directly to adults-but could lead to some interesting theories and ideas.

Also-I wanted to say-I skipped your thread for several days because I thought it was spam. So you might consider re-wording your title so that it is a little more obvious that it's not spam. ;)

Great topic by the way!
 
might want to check reputable sources

Pitocin, which most people call oxytocin, is not a hormone, and I don't think there is such a thing as a neurohormone.

It causes pregnant women to go into labor, and for everyone else it causes your gall bladder to empty it's contents, which is usually mistaken for dying, as in the person typically rushes to the ER thinking they are dying.

You are a very funny man helo
 

london

Banned
There was some research recently that suggested oxytocin can keep men monogamous. It was awful research but it was interesting all the same.

And yes, oxytocin if the hormone of love, labour and lactation. There is loads of research on everything from does lack of oxytocin in labour cause autism to t the stuff previously mentioned around premature babies.
 
Last edited:
I am sure there is lots of info floating around the net

I am talking about actual legitimate research. None of what you mentioned, nor anything on wikipedia mentioned under the entry is based on reality. Pitocin is not a hormone, and it's false info such as this is the exact reason I don't have respect for journalists, authors, grammarians, editors, pretty much anything associated with professional writing.

I am not trying to be insulting, I just don't understand how anybody could have such a serious interest in written or spoken languages yet fail to respect truth. In regards to disrespecting truth,what was acceptable in the 18th and 19th century due to censorship, is not acceptable in the 20th and no way in hell acceptable in the 21st century. While acceptable and unacceptable isn't exactly the right word, as it is a decision that every individual must make on their own, but nobody seems to realize that the only way to recognize the truth, is to have respect for it through the practice of honesty, anything less and it is impossible to know the truth.
 

london

Banned
All this is legitimate research, just various factors can limit the credibility of the results.

pitocin is artificial oxytocin.
 
pitocin is manufactured oxytocin

and perhaps whoever wrote all of those illegitimate, fabricated findings supposedly related to oxytocin, which cause Uterine contraction and mammary glands to dump it's contents of milk (and I have a suspicion may also cause a gall bladder to dump it's contents) but aside from that, all other research I have come across is complete and utter bullshit. And any grammarian should recognize the words parturition (grammarian speak for delivery) and they will also now the difference between the months OCT and CST.

They will also recognize the difference between contractile, contraction, and contracture

And they without a doubt know the four elements of a contractual relationship:
offer, acceptance, consideration, and breach of a contract

all clearly written out in those ugly olive green books with golden letters and highlights

nothing to do with you london, but the oxytocin fiasco goes far beyond publishing fabricated research results. So I really should have just left this one alone as I sure nobody here knows what the hell I am talking about. But I am not being responsible if I don't make at least an attempt to explain it.
 

london

Banned
I sure nobody here knows what the hell I am talking about

Nope, I'm a midwife and none of what you are saying makes any sense to me at all.
 
Top