Polyamory and Ethnicity

Helo

New member
I've been very active in observing and learning about the poly community over the last three years or so and one thing that has continued to stick out is the ethnic makeup of the poly world.

My direct experience has been with the poly community in Los Angeles but I've interacted with poly people across the US and I usually slip in a question about it. Obviously this deals mainly with people who are comfortable enough to go out to groups, get photographed, and talk to people online about the way they live. I'm firmly convinced that there are probably double, tripple, or even quadruple the number of ACTUAL poly people out there than those who make themselves visible.

Thus far it seems the poly community is heavily slanted white, at least in the US. I've also noted an almost complete lack Asian as well as a very low occurrence of African-American community members. I've had people comment on this before as sort of a general knowledge factoid, somewhat similar to the higher instances of Aspergers individuals in the poly community; its acknowledged, just un-explained.

What have your observations been on the ethnic makeup of the poly community?
 

LovingRadiance

Active member
Similar observations.

One idea that has been thrown around in our poly group and in other minority groups I am involved in is that anyone who is already part of a marginalized minority is at higher risk by being "out" about belonging to another marginalized minority.
Therefore-with the higher risk-they may be unable to safely be out.

For example, someone who is LGBT is at risk of discrimination.
But, someone who is LGBT and black is at a higher risk of discrimination-because they risk being discriminated for both being a minority=black and a minority=LGBT.
Someone who is LGBT, black and a woman has even higher as woman=minority, black=minority and LGBT=minority.
An LGBT, black, female, poly.... at that point the risk of losing work, home, personal safety is so high that it is literally mind-boggling the life risk they would be taking.

I tend to think there is probably a lot of truth to that concept. It makes sense to me and I've seen how it works with people who are racially, gender, sexual preference minorities in our community. :(
 

opalescent

Active member
That has been my experience generally as well. My local self-identifying poly community is mostly lower middle class white people. There are some working class people and very few upper middle class people. One could assume that wealth gives one the ability to do what one wants and not worry about social impacts of being poly, for example. But it seems to have the opposite - those people with the most to lose, wealthier folks, and those with the least margin for error to survive adopt a similar strategy of not being marginalized. Of course, I have absolutely no proof of this - just my own observations.

There are many African-American, Asian and Latino people active in my local community. However, I do live in a majority black city and so, the relatively imbalance is certainly present.

I also agree that if one is already part of something not mainstream, poly (and kink for many people as well) becomes more possible, more 'thinkable'. I also believe this is partly why there is heavy overlap of poly with folks who are also pagan, or geeky, or both.
 

Eternaldarkness

New member
I noticed that too, and being black it IS extra-difficult being part of yet another minority. Actually, myself and my girlfriend are black, so I guess we throw off the spread twice over.
 

Keeke

New member
A Quick Response...

As much as I would like delve deeply into this topic, I really don't care to write a sloppy essay, which it would be... I am a black female in a 3+ year relationship with a black male; we've lived together a year now, not married. Our relationship has always been "open," but over the course of the last few months I've tried to make the shift from "open" to poly since we've been straddling the fence anyway. For me the difference would be clarity and interaction between primaries and alternatives. He views his relationships as private and doesn't care to know about my "male friends." I am open about being polyamorous, while my primary does not consider himself poly at all. It is almost as though he prefers to be thought of as a cheating Don Juan.

Our situation is unique in that our housing, although in need of renovation, is secure. Our mandatory bills are few, we work on the house when possible, but otherwise our only worry is generating more income. We are somewhat on the fringe already, living in New Orleans and working in the hospitality industry. While I gave up on being normal years ago, my primary still cares to pretend. He is nine years younger than myself.

Although I was not in a rush to have children when we first got together, I now hear my biological clock ticking. He, on the other hand is content to remain child-free. We are now entering a new phase in our relationship where I'm actively seeking a man or couple to co-parent with me. So at this exciting juncture, we're preparing for the shift in our lives and trying to to understand how this will work- the housing plan.

In New Orleans it is common for black men to have relationships with multiple women at the same time. However, in the cases that the women know about each other (usually because of kids), the extracurricular relationship(s) is/are tolerated at best. No-one involved would consider it a polyamorous relationship, or making it one, which is crazy to me because in a lot of these cases the overall "family" could benefit from combining financial and social assets. The women involved were not informed, and never would have agreed to share a man if truth were told. Instead, casual sexual relationships evolve into sticky familial situations once someone(s) turns up pregnant. The smart ones make it work for the benefit of their children.

I believe that because of this, my situation is able to exist. When I share my experience with others, the response is shock and amazement. They can't get past the fact that I openly date and have relationships with multiple men at a time. Sex and jealousy clouds their minds. A lot of people in New Orleans have multiple relationships at a time, but they are not honest with those involved. I think this is the case with a lot of relationships in ethnic communities.
 

AnnabelMore

New member
In my city, there is a large correlation between being a minority and being poor. I imagine that when you're struggling to find housing and food, even if you *are* poly, going to a poly meet up group event and being an active and visible member of the poly community is not going to be your top priority.

Then there's this random statistic from the Pew Research Center:
"Of all the major racial and ethnic groups in the United States, black Americans are the most likely to report a formal religious affiliation. Even among those blacks who are unaffiliated, three-in-four belong to the "religious unaffiliated" category (that is, they say that religion is either somewhat or very important in their lives), compared with slightly more than one-third of the unaffiliated population overall."

So, religiosity could have a large impact too, I imagine.
 

Keeke

New member
Didn't Consider Religion...

I can see where religion could play a part. I often find myself in the company of people that consider themselves practicing Christians who have wild sexual escapades on a regular basis, including members only activities. These same people turn their noses up at polyamory. For them swinging and children outside of their marriages are okay, but polyamory? Never! They don't care to share on a long-term basis.


Then there's this random statistic from the Pew Research Center:
"Of all the major racial and ethnic groups in the United States, black Americans are the most likely to report a formal religious affiliation. Even among those blacks who are unaffiliated, three-in-four belong to the "religious unaffiliated" category (that is, they say that religion is either somewhat or very important in their lives), compared with slightly more than one-third of the unaffiliated population overall."

So, religiosity could have a large impact too, I imagine.
 

Hades36

New member
This is a great topic! Thank you for starting the thread, Helo! :D

I've seen a few things that I would like to offer to the discussion. I preface this by saying my comments are about Black and White people specifically although I realize, as we all do, race and ethnicity encompass a much broader range of cultures than those two. But. I'm Black and PLove (wife) is White so that is my point of reference; I would feel disingenuous writing about other cultural experiences without firsthand knowledge.

Ok...so about Blacks and poly...

1. In my experience, Black people have poly arrangements as well BUT keep them in the closet because they fear judgment and ridicule, or just discuss them in different terms. Instead of calling it poly, a Black woman may just admit to having a number of "friends" that she keeps company with and who all know about each other. This same woman may also have a female lover, or a guy who is her "primary" but lives in another city and is cool with her dating other people because he does the same.

2. Minority groups are always striving to be a part of the mainstream in ways that the dominant group has already been able to enjoy for generations. So while White people have had the opportunity to take for granted strong, stable families, healthy communities, and generational wealth, Blacks have, largely, NOT been able to take part in these trends. So, many Blacks are still focused on the idea of having the "American Dream", which is getting married, having a family, and settling down into their own version of The Cosby Show. Its another reason why there were so few Black hippies: at a time when Blacks were trying to break IN to mainstream culture, these affluent, white teenagers were rebelling against it. So, short answer: White people, being the dominant culture, can afford to explore poly because they have the security to do so while Blacks are still fighting to get their families and communities in order.

3. There is a lot of racism in the poly community! PLove and I have met a number of White people who made it clear by their actions and conversation that, while they were poly, dating outside of their race was still something that was taboo. We've run into the same shit with swingers; usually its a White couple that makes it very clear that they are absolutely not open to any other race but White. Hey, everyone has their preferences, so I can dig it. But if you're White and poly, I would ask how many times you've put yourself into spaces in such a way that you could actually make a real connection with Black people beyond the superficial one that most of us experience? In my experience, poly is extremely segregated. I know a number of Black couples/singles who are poly (or at least non-monogamous) but who only connect with other Black people; when PLove and I attended our local Poly Meet-up, I was the only Black person there.

4. IMHO, there is probably MORE polyamory practiced in the Black community than in the White community. Why? Because historically the Black community has suffered from greater levels of poverty and lack of resources, which would lead to, I would suspect, a natural inclination towards polyamorous arrangements. One guy taking care of multiple women, a woman with multiple partners, all to improve access to resources, safety, security, and the strength of the community. I may be completely wrong, especially since there are some studies that suggest minority groups actually tend to embrace more rigid, conservative values even MORE than their dominant counterparts.

In my personal experience, I was raised in a poor Black neighborhood in Pittsburgh. My parents were happily married BUT my father had a number of girlfriends in the community and my mother had one guy who she spent time with off and on. It wasn't that big of a secret but I didn't realize just how unusual it was until I got old enough to start dating and having sex myself. So, I imagine that, if my parents, who were older and Southern, were doing it back then...its not a new fangled thing in the Black community.
 

Helo

New member
3. There is a lot of racism in the poly community! PLove and I have met a number of White people who made it clear by their actions and conversation that, while they were poly, dating outside of their race was still something that was taboo. We've run into the same shit with swingers; usually its a White couple that makes it very clear that they are absolutely not open to any other race but White. Hey, everyone has their preferences, so I can dig it. But if you're White and poly, I would ask how many times you've put yourself into spaces in such a way that you could actually make a real connection with Black people beyond the superficial one that most of us experience? In my experience, poly is extremely segregated. I know a number of Black couples/singles who are poly (or at least non-monogamous) but who only connect with other Black people; when PLove and I attended our local Poly Meet-up, I was the only Black person there.
I would disagree with the bolded.

Having a preference for a certain aspect of people I dont think implies that you somehow are against or dislike the other possibilities, and that goes for racial characteristics as well as things like hair color, height, weight, etc. I have a serious thing for red-heads but I wont turn down someone who is blonde specifically because they're blonde.

From what I've seen, non-whites are a very small part of the poly community but when they are part they tend to be accepted wholesale. In the local group I've been to, there are maybe ten (out of ~50-60) people who are non-white and of those five or so are black. I've never seen anyone treat them with anything less than respect, I've seen them get physically involved with other people (and couples) with no discomfort on either part.

Maybe its because I'm in LA, but I've never seen non-white ethnic people be treated with anything less than full respect. If anything, they tend to be a bit of a special interest and a novelty because they're so uncommon in the poly community.
 

Hades36

New member
Philly is a very segregated city, Helo. So, yes, maybe it is about location. I can only go on what I have seen and heard in my own experiences and do my best to extrapolate a theory from that admittedly limited data.
 

AnnabelMore

New member
Well, surely you're each talking about your own experiences, which are going to differ from community to community. Not to mention from person to person -- one individual might never see an instance of racism occur in front of them in a particular group, another might experience it several times, and both things would be true, since people don't always reveal their prejudices to everyone around them in the same way. Is the poly community as a whole (not that there is such a thing, necessarily) more prejudiced than any other group? I would hope not. But we do live in a prejudiced society, and poly people are just people within that society.

Note also that having a preference for redheads, but still being perfectly willing to date blonds, is very different, in several key ways, from not being willing to date or swing outside your race. Personally, I would lose a lot of respect for anyone who refused to consider getting involved with someone... as a friend, a lover, or a partner... based solely on the color of their skin -- that goes way beyond preference and is, in fact, the definition of prejudice. If one's "preferences" run that deep, one really ought to examine and unpack them (I'm not trying to imply at all, Helo, that you were saying you felt that way, just musing).
 

nycindie

Active member
I live in NYC. Even though it's a big city, the poly community here seems to be much smaller than one would expect, at least to me. Even more surprising is the dominance of white people at the few organized poly gatherings I have attended. There are always a few people who are Asian or of Asian descent, but I can only recall one or two black people. NYC is more segregated than one would believe, I think. I have lived in NYC for over 20 years and there is only one black person who lives on my block. On the outside, it looks like we're one big melting pot, but many ethnic groups really keep to themselves.

So I wonder if poly is also quite prevalent a practice in the black community here, without calling it poly, like it is in Philly. I do remember walking through Union Square one day last summer and overhearing a black woman talking about being fluid-bonded with someone, which really caught my attention because that term is something I've only heard in poly circles.
 

Hades36

New member
@nycindie: I personally believe that the illusion of poly being a "mostly White phenomenon" is one based on lack of knowledge about and connection between races. Its like how I always thought serious, committed relationships were mainly a "heterosexual thing" until I started meeting and befriending LGBT couples who expressed the same intensity of love, dedication, and pair bonding with each other.

And, believe me, there are plenty of Blacks who have told me, "Poly? Open relationships? That's a White thing!" Meanwhile, most Black people know plenty of relationships in their community and family that are 3-somes, 4-somes, and Moresomes of varying levels.

Maybe its just semantics?

@AnnabelMore: Great response! But I wonder when personal preference crosses the line into prejudice, or if it ever does without being catalyzed by fear, ignorance, and hatred? I mean, I have never really been THAT attracted to Asian women and probably would only date Southeast Asian women, at that. Does that make me prejudice? I don't know. Maybe.
 
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Helo

New member
Philly is a very segregated city, Helo. So, yes, maybe it is about location. I can only go on what I have seen and heard in my own experiences and do my best to extrapolate a theory from that admittedly limited data.
I think we're all in that boat XD We kind have to do our own community studies because no one else is doing them.

Note also that having a preference for redheads, but still being perfectly willing to date blonds, is very different, in several key ways, from not being willing to date or swing outside your race. Personally, I would lose a lot of respect for anyone who refused to consider getting involved with someone... as a friend, a lover, or a partner... based solely on the color of their skin -- that goes way beyond preference and is, in fact, the definition of prejudice. If one's "preferences" run that deep, one really ought to examine and unpack them (I'm not trying to imply at all, Helo, that you were saying you felt that way, just musing).
I have to concur with Hades; when does preference turn into prejudice?

Would your opinion of me change if I said I would never date blondes because I found the hair color unattractive?

I think we're in danger of putting the definition of racism into pants its too small for. The generally accepted definition of racism is "hatred or intolerance of another race" and I dont know if you can call someone racist because they'd prefer not to sleep with someone of a particular race. If they say "Oh I wont sleep with THOSE people because they're Crayola" ok yeah that's clearly a racist statement.

If we use that, then we start edging into the territory of accusing gay men and women of being sexist because (if) they wont sleep with members of the opposite gender.
 

AnnabelMore

New member
Would your opinion of me change if I said I would never date blondes because I found the hair color unattractive?

I think we're in danger of putting the definition of racism into pants its too small for. The generally accepted definition of racism is "hatred or intolerance of another race" and I dont know if you can call someone racist because they'd prefer not to sleep with someone of a particular race. If they say "Oh I wont sleep with THOSE people because they're Crayola" ok yeah that's clearly a racist statement.

If we use that, then we start edging into the territory of accusing gay men and women of being sexist because (if) they wont sleep with members of the opposite gender.

I don't think it's fair to compare hair color to skin color, because they don't have the same connotations in our society. If you said you didn't date blond women because you found their hair color unattractive, I'd be a little confused, I'd ask you if it was really such a hard line that you wouldn't date a blond girl even if she was smart and funny and kind and witty and you really got along... like, could the color REALLY be such a big deal? And if you said yes, I'd just shrug and wonder if, like, a blond woman was mean to you when you were a kid or something. I *would* kind of consider it a prejudice of a sort, but it certainly wouldn't mean you were racist, because blond is not a race.

On the other hand, if you said you didn't date black women because you found their skin color unattractive, then, yeah, I would say "wow, that's kind of racist, man, you might wanna examine and work on that." Because, for centuries, our culture has held up whiteness as the height of attractiveness and looked down on black people. You could be the most un-racist person in terms of your *conscious* thoughts and beliefs, but still have absorbed unconscious prejudices because we live in a prejudiced culture. It happens to the best of us. And it's something to recognize and work on. If you told me that you wouldn't date a black girl even if she was smart and funny and kind and witty and you really got along, I would consider it a *racial* prejudice, because black, unlike blond, is a race. I'm NOT saying it would make you a bad person or even a racist (consciously)... but if you were completely unwilling to consider that it might be an unconscious racial prejudice and work on it, then, yeah I would look at you differently. Same for the Asian thing that Hades brought up, for the record -- if a person could honestly say that they wouldn't date, say, a Japanese girl, even if she was perfect for them in every other way and there was a real, genuine connection, I would tell them that they ought to really think that through and try to break it down.

Sex and gender, on the other hand, are *completely* different from either of these things and, again, it's an unfair comparison.
 

Helo

New member
I don't think it's fair to compare hair color to skin color, because they don't have the same connotations in our society. If you said you didn't date blond women because you found their hair color unattractive, I'd be a little confused, I'd ask you if it was really such a hard line that you wouldn't date a blond girl even if she was smart and funny and kind and witty and you really got along... like, could the color REALLY be such a big deal? And if you said yes, I'd just shrug and wonder if, like, a blond woman was mean to you when you were a kid or something. I *would* kind of consider it a prejudice of a sort, but it certainly wouldn't mean you were racist, because blond is not a race.
The basic question is is it prejudiced to refuse to date a specific group of people based on something about that group of people, real or imagined? Couch it in race, hair color, eye color, sexuality, gender, or whatever provided you dont have an issue with that group in daily life; you dont consider them inferior or treat them worse than you would a member of your own group.

On the other hand, if you said you didn't date black women because you found their skin color unattractive, then, yeah, I would say "wow, that's kind of racist, man, you might wanna examine and work on that." Because, for centuries, our culture has held up whiteness as the height of attractiveness and looked down on black people. You could be the most un-racist person in terms of your *conscious* thoughts and beliefs, but still have absorbed unconscious prejudices because we live in a prejudiced culture. It happens to the best of us. And it's something to recognize and work on. If you told me that you wouldn't date a black girl even if she was smart and funny and kind and witty and you really got along, I would consider it a *racial* prejudice, because black, unlike blond, is a race. I'm NOT saying it would make you a bad person or even a racist (consciously)... but if you were completely unwilling to consider that it might be an unconscious racial prejudice and work on it, then, yeah I would look at you differently. Same for the Asian thing that Hades brought up, for the record -- if a person could honestly say that they wouldn't date, say, a Japanese girl, even if she was perfect for them in every other way and there was a real, genuine connection, I would tell them that they ought to really think that through and try to break it down.
I'm uncomfortable with the idea that racism can be unconscious because it takes responsibility away from the individual and is completely indefensible from a personal stance.

You (not you specifically) can accuse someone of being racist (or just prejudiced in general) and when they deny it, you can say its unconscious and there really isnt anything you can say against that. It basically turns the idea of racism into a "finishing move" to which there is nothing the person its leveled against can say without being accused of further prejudice.

Sex and gender, on the other hand, are *completely* different from either of these things and, again, it's an unfair comparison.
I disagree and I think we can make that comparison in this instance.

I dont think I'm going too far out on a limb by assuming we both agree that neither sexuality nor race are plastic concepts within a person; you cant forcibly change either one, they are inherent and inborn characteristics of us all.

So why then can we not level the charge of sexism at the gay community for refusing to sleep with someone of the opposite gender just as we have been talking about leveling the charge of sexism at someone who refuses to sleep with a certain ethnic group provided they dont have a problem with that racial group in daily life or act any different towards them?

As I said, I think we're stretching the definition of racism to cover something that it doesn't actually refer to and as a result we get caught up in a possible double standard.
 

BrigidsDaughter

New member
I'm a red headed white female. My husband is white and my boyfriend is black. Our local poly community appears to be made up of 99% while people.

I am not saying it's right or wrong of a person to chose not to sleep with a person of another race, but at least with Swingers the relationship is even more in the closet... if the wife suddenly turns up pregnant with her black lover's baby, then what? It would be a sure fire way to get outed. So that might explain why some poly people and swingers stick to their own racial backgrounds. Not something I personally have to worry about, but I suppose that there are those who do.
 

AnnabelMore

New member
The basic question is is it prejudiced to refuse to date a specific group of people based on something about that group of people, real or imagined? Couch it in race, hair color, eye color, sexuality, gender, or whatever provided you dont have an issue with that group in daily life; you dont consider them inferior or treat them worse than you would a member of your own group.

Actually, I think this is a complex enough issue that you can't boil it down to such a basic question. I continue to disagree that it makes any sense to conflate hair and eye color with race, just to stick with that example. Within living memory, in our country, it was ILLEGAL for people of different races to marry. It has never been illegal for people of different eye colors to marry. Several generations ago, many white people in America considered the idea of one of their children getting involved with a black person to be, not just illegal and immoral, but distasteful, cause for *violence*. We are still struggling, as a society, with those hateful prejudices -- we've come a very, very long way, but there's too much history there, too much racism that still exists, to say that we're over it as a society. Eye color and skin color, when it comes to who we consider acceptable mates, are not the same in our societal context.

I'm uncomfortable with the idea that racism can be unconscious because it takes responsibility away from the individual and is completely indefensible from a personal stance.

It doesn't make me comfortable either, but unfortunately, it's a real thing -- http://www.livescience.com/16339-culture-racism.html

Where personal responsibility comes into it, is that you can choose to face this uncomfortable fact about what it means to have been raised in our society, work to understand it, identify where it might exist in your own life or the lives of those around you, and attempt to confront it, break it down, change it. We can make a better society by taking personal responsibility, even for the things that we didn't ask for.

You (not you specifically) can accuse someone of being racist (or just prejudiced in general) and when they deny it, you can say its unconscious and there really isnt anything you can say against that. It basically turns the idea of racism into a "finishing move" to which there is nothing the person its leveled against can say without being accused of further prejudice.

One could choose to use it as an accusation to shut down conversation, sure. But that wouldn't be fair or cool, and you would deserve to be called out for it. I don't think that just because we acknowledge that unconscious racism is real, it means that people must automatically get away with using it as a brickbat to shut down others. I don't see how that follows at all, actually. Any time you make an argument, you need to back it up with why you think it is the case.

I disagree and I think we can make that comparison in this instance.

I dont think I'm going too far out on a limb by assuming we both agree that neither sexuality nor race are plastic concepts within a person; you cant forcibly change either one, they are inherent and inborn characteristics of us all.

So why then can we not level the charge of sexism at the gay community for refusing to sleep with someone of the opposite gender just as we have been talking about leveling the charge of sexism at someone who refuses to sleep with a certain ethnic group provided they dont have a problem with that racial group in daily life or act any different towards them?

As I said, I think we're stretching the definition of racism to cover something that it doesn't actually refer to and as a result we get caught up in a possible double standard.

Skin and hair color are superficial characteristics that denote no real difference between people beyond exceedingly minor things, like, say, susceptibility to a particular genetic disease. There are infinite permutations of race when different ethnic groups blend, there is no clear dividing line. Sex (while it can be a broad and fluid spectrum with many exceptions and variations), in general, represents two distinct, real categories with physical, hormonal, pheremonal differences. Your parts fit together differently, depending on your sex. Your pheremones fit into each other's brains differently depending on your sex. Of COURSE those things are going to fundamentally affect attraction! Color, on the other hand, is cosmetic.

It's not comparable.
 

Tonberry

New member
I think the main distinction is whether you are attracted to specific people, and notice after the fact ("hey, I don't get attracted to females/black people/blondes") or if you decide "I won't date someone who is..." and then refuse to consider them based on that fact.

I do think that you can compare all of these things, because they're based on attraction. I think it is much more common to "discriminate" in who you're attracted to based on gender or sex than the rest, which is why the rest is usually considered fetishes. If you're unable to be attracted to someone who doesn't have piercings, you're not considered "normal", but if that's the way your attraction works, it's the way your attraction works. You don't get aroused? Can't be blamed for that.

If, however, you say "people who don't have any piercings are stupid and boring and I refuse to associate with them", you're passing a judgement and you are bigoted and discriminating (YOU are discriminating, rather than your libido doing it).

It might be hard to draw the line (do I not get aroused by X because of some internalised judgement I am not aware of, or is it just part of my "orientation"?) but I still think that if you're not ever attracted to someone who is X, that doesn't mean you are necessarily bigotted against X.

Now, it seems weird for things like that to work on "changeable" attributes. For instance, if you can only be attracted to long hair, but neglect to tell the woman you are dating, and she has a hair cut, are you suddenly unable to be attracted to her? Do you have to wait for 2 years for it to grow back before you'll consider anything with her?
With hair colour, would dyeing it work, or is it a hormonal thing, so that you can tell anyways?

But ultimately, I think as long as you know what you want, you're golden.

Now, if I think back about everyone I've been attracted to, not a lot of them are part of minorities... but I also don't seem to hang out with a lot of people who are, for some reason, so I don't think I'm less attracted to them, they're just a smaller pool to begin with. On the other hand, I know I'm not attracted to females at all. And when I was younger, I was not attracted to men younger than their late 20s, but this has changed.

As long as you follow your arousal and preferences rather than try to dictate them, I think you're good. The bigoted person is the one who still won't date Xs when they start being attracted to them.
 
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