Stop The Vinsanity...

vinsanity0

Active member
Thanks for the update. So you had a second test? I hope you get the results today? I'm glad your other people are negative, but good luck to your mom.

I wonder if you got it at that outdoor bar thing where Pet's friends were all crowding around you?

Yes, when I came up positive they told me to get retested in two weeks. My mom's test came back negative. She happened to test at the same place I did in the same day. She went in the morning and I went in the afternoon. Mine should come in today or tomorrow, I hope.

I'm trying not to overthink it. Florida has had problems with some of the rapid testing. It's entirely possible mine was a false positive and my stroke was a coincidence.
 

vinsanity0

Active member
Finally got my test results back and it's negative. The reason it took so long was they used my middle name instead of my first name for some reason. I checked out my middle name on a whim and it came up. I don't understand why human beings are so incompetent.

Some interesting developments coming soon...
 

Evie

Well-known member
Tease.
 

SEASONEDpolyAgain

Active member
Did you have that test within 5 days of the stroke? Apparently the swab tests are only accurate within 5 days of whatever symptom.

You'd know more from an antibody test.

My neighbor had a bad cold/flu in April. Not thought to be Covid. Afterwards, she was left with severely reduced lung capacity that she is still recovering from. Her recent antibody test showed that she has had covid. Now they believe that she had covid and this respiratory issue is due to the virus. She is now clear but having similar rehab to those who were more severely ill with the virus.
 

vinsanity0

Active member
Did you have that test within 5 days of the stroke? Apparently the swab tests are only accurate within 5 days of whatever symptom.

You'd know more from an antibody test.

My neighbor had a bad cold/flu in April. Not thought to be Covid. Afterwards, she was left with severely reduced lung capacity that she is still recovering from. Her recent antibody test showed that she has had covid. Now they believe that she had covid and this respiratory issue is due to the virus. She is now clear but having similar rehab to those who were more severely ill with the virus.
The first test was the day after my stroke. The second test was 2 weeks later. I haven't had any Covid symptoms at all. It's not conclusive that the stroke was caused by this. I have underlying health problems that could have caused it.

Here in Florida there have been false positives with the rapid test ( my first test) so it's even possible I was never infected. I haven't had any antibody tests.
 

SEASONEDpolyAgain

Active member
The first test was the day after my stroke. The second test was 2 weeks later. I haven't had any Covid symptoms at all. It's not conclusive that the stroke was caused by this. I have underlying health problems that could have caused it.

Here in Florida there have been false positives with the rapid test ( my first test) so it's even possible I was never infected. I haven't had any antibody tests.

That's what I'm saying. 2 weeks would have been too long to pick up whether you were infected around the time of the stroke. The test you did have at that time said positive (right?).

Now the only way to have a good (but not certain) idea of whether or not you did have covid (and the stroke being a result of that... maybe) is if you have an antibody test which would tell you if you've EVER been infected.
 

JaneQSmythe

Active member
Now the only way to have a good (but not certain) idea of whether or not you did have covid (and the stroke being a result of that... maybe) is if you have an antibody test which would tell you if you've EVER been infected.

Unfortunately, the utility of the current antibody tests are not impressive when applied to a single individual - they are more useful on a population (or clinical trial) level as the incidence of false positives (as a result of cross reactivity with other coronaviruses?) and false negatives (as a result of variable levels of different antibodies produced by different people?) are so high as to make any individual test result highly suspect. We have the same trouble with Lyme testing (and have had a LOT longer to work on that particular problem!).

At this point, a PCR test done within 5 days of onset of symptoms (before or after) is the most accurate test we have - but the lag times in getting results (3 to 14 days where I am) makes it practically useless for contact tracing!). The rapid test is so inaccurate that we don't use it in our facility - it is more appropriate if you are testing the same people over and over again and can catch a pattern - like a cluster of positives in a "pod".
 
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SEASONEDpolyAgain

Active member
Unfortunately, the utility of the current antibody tests are not impressive when applied to a single individual - they are more useful on a population (or clinical trial) level as the incidence of false positives (as a result of cross reactivity with other coronaviruses?) and false negatives (as a result of variable levels of different antibodies produced by different people?) are so high as to make any individual test result highly suspect. We have the same trouble with Lyme testing (and have had a LOT longer to work on that particular problem!).

At this point, a PCR test done within 5 days of onset of symptoms (before or after) is the most accurate test we have - but the lag times in getting results (3 to 14 days where I am) makes it practically useless for contact tracing!). The rapid test is so inaccurate that we don't use it in our facility - it is more appropriate if you are testing the same people over and over again and can catch a pattern - like a cluster of positives in a "pod".


Most of Europe are using serum antibody tests to find out who has had it and how long they'll be immune. It is to replace PCR tests but to back them up and find out how long people stay immune.

You reduce false positives on the antibody test by backing up test results and who is tested with clinical information. You dont just go and test anyone with money for a test. You test people you have reason to believe may have had it and those who need to know, like frontline workers.

Either way, antibodies are the only way Vinsanity will have more information. There was absolutely no point in taking the second test when he was asymptomatic and 14 days after the stroke. All swab tests tell you is whether you have it at the time of the swab so you can stay inside.

Oh and one thing that I don't think US people seem to be doing is that while you wait for tests results from PCR tests, you should be isolating in case you have it. Nobody should be having a test and then going out as normal. Completely defeats the object. If you've had to have a swab test for reasons, stay in until you know.
 

FallenAngelina

Active member
Oh and one thing that I don't think US people seem to be doing is...

You do realize that the US is akin to 50 European countries? We don't all do anything the same. Vin is in Florida and what he's describing is vastly different than what has happened in New York. New York experiences with Covid testing and medical care will differ greatly from those in Minnesota, etc. The US is 400 million square miles with 382 million people - each state run by many of its own laws, in its unique culture, its own economy, its own legislature and its own governor. New York was blasted beyond belief by Covid in the spring and now we have the lowest transmission rate in the country. The response to this illness varies tremendously by state. The differences have been made even greater by the lack of national leadership. The governor of each state has had to step up (or not) like never before and the health of the people is completely in the hands of state leadership, not national.

If you're going by media reports, then this goes double. There really is no such thing as "what the people in the US seem to be doing," especially when it comes to Covid-19. We are an extraordinarily enormous and diverse nation.
 
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SEASONEDpolyAgain

Active member
You do realize that the US is akin to 50 European countries? We don't all do anything the same. Vin is in Florida and what he's describing is vastly different than what has happened in New York. New York experiences with Covid testing and medical care will differ greatly from those in Minnesota, etc. The US is 400 million square miles with 382 million people - each state run by many of its own laws, in its unique culture, its own economy, its own legislature and its own governor. New York was blasted beyond belief by Covid in the spring and now we have the lowest transmission rate in the country. The response to this illness varies tremendously by state. The differences have been made even greater by the lack of national leadership. The governor of each state has had to step up (or not) like never before and the health of the people is completely in the hands of state leadership, not national.

If you're going by media reports, then this goes double. There really is no such thing as "what the people in the US seem to be doing," especially when it comes to Covid-19. We are an extraordinarily enormous and diverse nation.


Do remember that I'm American myself. I just don't live there.

This is the CDC advice on what to do if a family member has covid and if you've had close contact with someone positive:

Most people who get COVID-19 will be able to recover at home. CDC has directions for people who are recovering at home and their caregivers, including:

Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
Use a separate room and bathroom for sick household members (if possible).
Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
Provide your sick household member with clean disposable facemasks to wear at home, if available, to help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others.
Clean the sick room and bathroom, as needed, to avoid unnecessary contact with the sick person.
However, some people may need emergency medical attention. Watch for symptoms and learn when to seek emergency medical attention.

When to Seek Emergency Medical Attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately

Trouble breathing
Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
New confusion
Inability to wake or stay awake
Bluish lips or face
*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Be alert for symptoms. Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if you have symptoms
.

Nowhere does it say that your contact with a symptomatic person means you need to stay in your house and get tested yourself. It does say this if you are the sick person, but not if you've been in contact with the sick person. This means that the advice that all states receive will be equally flawed. And it means that people who are tested because of their contact with someone positive will be going around and spreading it while they await results (which from the sounds of it, many don't believe anyway).
 

vinsanity0

Active member
The people who were in contact with me got tested on their own, for their own peace of mind. It wasn't recommended or required by anyone. I was told to quarantine myself for two weeks, which I did. The second test was to just make sure I was no longer infected. The second test had nothing to do with determining whether or not I had Covid-19 at the time of the stroke.

The only reason I was tested to begin with was because I went to the hospital for the stroke. They test to figure out if I'm a risk. But, as Jane pointed out, those tests aren't exactly reliable. I asked if it might be a false positive, but they didn't seem all that concerned. The doctor said they weren't going to connect the positive result to my stroke. I suppose I could go get an antibody test on my own dime but I have no insurance so I'm not doing that. Even if I tested positive for antibodies, it wouldn't be conclusive proof that the Covid caused the stroke. It doesn't really matter. If the doctors wanted to follow up, as in a study, I would be happy to cooperate, but that's not happening.
 

PinkPig

Member
Nowhere does it say that your contact with a symptomatic person means you need to stay in your house and get tested yourself. It does say this if you are the sick person, but not if you've been in contact with the sick person. This means that the advice that all states receive will be equally flawed. And it means that people who are tested because of their contact with someone positive will be going around and spreading it while they await results (which from the sounds of it, many don't believe anyway).

I am in the US, and I was quarantined due to an exposure. I've also had friends, family members, and employees be tested and/or quarantined due to symptoms and/ or exposure. In all cases, contact tracing was not done officially. People were notified by friends or employers that they'd had an exposure. My friends and family members who tested positive were not followed up on by any medical professionals, health departments, etc. Employers followed up because they wanted to know how it affected them and their employees. These people live in about 10 counties across 4 states. The cases happened between Apr 1 and July 29. Lack of contact tracing is a huge problem, imo.

When I had my exposure, I had no symptoms but easily scheduled testing without a doctor's order. At the time of testing, I was told if I tested positive, to quarantine for 14 days from the date of the test. If I tested negative, quarantine for 14 days from date of the exposure. I was negative. And followed quarantine. All of the people I know have followed their quarantine orders. But then they all also wore masks without a mandate. But they were also all given wildly different information on quarantining... and usually were only given verbal orders, nothing in writing. I had my test results the quickest.

My opinion is that lack of tracing, lack of follow up, and lack of consistency in the information we receive, along with all the anti-maskers is why the US can't get ahead of the curve.
 

vinsanity0

Active member
It never ends lol. Now I have to worry about a hurricane coming. The good news is it's only a category 1 and will probably stay off the coast. I guess I'll find out tomorrow.
 

SEASONEDpolyAgain

Active member
I am in the US, and I was quarantined due to an exposure. I've also had friends, family members, and employees be tested and/or quarantined due to symptoms and/ or exposure. In all cases, contact tracing was not done officially. People were notified by friends or employers that they'd had an exposure. My friends and family members who tested positive were not followed up on by any medical professionals, health departments, etc. Employers followed up because they wanted to know how it affected them and their employees. These people live in about 10 counties across 4 states. The cases happened between Apr 1 and July 29. Lack of contact tracing is a huge problem, imo.

When I had my exposure, I had no symptoms but easily scheduled testing without a doctor's order. At the time of testing, I was told if I tested positive, to quarantine for 14 days from the date of the test. If I tested negative, quarantine for 14 days from date of the exposure. I was negative. And followed quarantine. All of the people I know have followed their quarantine orders. But then they all also wore masks without a mandate. But they were also all given wildly different information on quarantining... and usually were only given verbal orders, nothing in writing. I had my test results the quickest.

My opinion is that lack of tracing, lack of follow up, and lack of consistency in the information we receive, along with all the anti-maskers is why the US can't get ahead of the curve.

Don't get me wrong, it has been FAR from ideal here. But in terms of telling people who should isolate and when, they've been pretty consistent in saying that people who are high risk (this is what has changed rapidly) for having the virus at this moment should stay in their homes and not go out for 1-2 weeks.

I had US friends who were really trying to "stop the spread" but had no idea that if a household member had symptoms, they have to completely stay in the house themselves. Nobody reiterated this to them when they sought medical attention/were diagnosed. I spoke about one of these people on my blog. Their partner was on a ventilator with covid after rapid deterioration at home (ok now thankfully) and they could not be with them (obviously) yet was out shopping for paint to take their mind off of the turmoil. We were facetime and then I was like Why the fuck are you out?!?!?!?!?! No doctor or anyone had advised them to isolate totally. This is in NJ.
 

FallenAngelina

Active member
Do remember that I'm American myself. I just don't live there.
You are perhaps American, but you're not experiencing Covid here. The CDC has proven to be useless and ignored. There is no national leadership on this, so every governor is ipso facto head of the Covid crisis in that state. The story in New York is polar opposite to what's happening in Florida and South Carolina. Washington State, Maryland and Michigan governors get high marks. The Southern states in general are suffering miserably with stubborn leadership and unwillingness among the governors to impose restrictions. There is no such thing as how "America" is doing, there are only wildly different state-specific stories.
 

SEASONEDpolyAgain

Active member
You are perhaps American, but you're not experiencing Covid here. The CDC has proven to be useless and ignored. There is no national leadership on this, so every governor is ipso facto head of the Covid crisis in that state. The story in New York is polar opposite to what's happening in Florida and South Carolina. Washington State, Maryland and Michigan governors get high marks. The Southern states in general are suffering miserably with stubborn leadership and unwillingness among the governors to impose restrictions. There is no such thing as how "America" is doing, there are only wildly different state-specific stories.

I think I've seen enough to say that the advice given in any state re when one should isolate has not mirrored that of other countries. Americans, on the whole, do not know when they should be staying in totally.
 

vinsanity0

Active member
I started a post but managed to lose it so here goes again...

So, I did have that dinner. During dinner she brought up poly. Remember, at first she thought poly meant like threesomes or group sex. I had corrected that. Now she was asking if it was like triads or ktp all the time. Not surprising considering that is how it is portrayed in mainstream media. So I briefly explained how my previous polycule with Cat, Elle, Sprite, Mary, and MK worked.

She was skeptical, holding onto the monogamy default. I talked with her a little more about it and she indicated she'd like to read a little more about it. I recommended the More Than Two website. She said she would check it out. Then we went in with dinner and I left.

I think it was two days later I got my results back. Did I mention they screwed up and used my middle name as my first name? I checked that on a lark and there were my results lol.

So I went back over for dinner and the much awaited first BDSM session. As we were waiting for dinner she told me she checked out the website and decided she was fine with poly. Of course I'm a little skeptical of this, but it may be a while before this is put to the test, due to Covid and all.

She did ask me some questions about logistics. Her questions led me to believe it would be best to practice parallel poly, which is fine by me.

We then had our session, which was pretty good, considering she is a stone cold newbie. I spent the night. And the next night and maybe a couple more nights lol

Sounds good, right? But I have a conundrum. My libido has taken a dive. I just don't seem to be all that interested in sex, which is weird because that's all I've been thinking about for quite some time. I guess this is something I should ask my doctor about? Maybe it's my medication. And sure, I had a mild stroke, but it's not like it exhausted me physically or anything. I felt fine except for my eyesight and a slight headache.

Pet, otoh, is extremely horny and talks about sex a lot. It reminds me of what happened with MK. Back then I was still grieving so I had an excuse for not being as horny. Now? I don't know. All I know is I have this woman who is ready, willing, and able to do whatever I want sexually and I'm happy hanging out and watching TV. WTF?
 

icesong

Member
I mean, to be fair, you did just have a life altering medical event - didn't you say you are going to have to change careers because of the stroke?
 

vinsanity0

Active member
I mean, to be fair, you did just have a life altering medical event - didn't you say you are going to have to change careers because of the stroke?

Yes, but I feel fine, more or less. I think it has to do with my medications, especially the blood thinner they put me on. I'll mention it to my doc next time I go in.
 
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